An acceptable use of public space?

IMG_0244

We have discussed extensively how “public” actual public spaces are in class. In the Commons in Downtown Minneapolis, there is a sculpture that clearly resembles something one would find children climbing on at a playground. Without a sign to guide us, it was entirely possible that we were scaling something that was meant to be art, not a play structure. However, there was no indication that this was an inappropriate use of public space, so was this an acceptable way to interact with this object? We may never know…

Appropriate use of public space?

IMG_0244

We have discussed extensively how “public” actual public spaces are in class. In the Commons in Downtown Minneapolis, there is a sculpture that clearly resembles something one would find children climbing on at a playground. Without a sign to guide us, it was entirely possible that we were scaling something that was meant to be art, not a play structure. However, there was no indication that this was an inappropriate use of public space, so was this an acceptable way to interact with this object? We may never know…

Relic of a former market

IMG_2752

There is something especially melancholy about a vacant building with such a beautiful facade. This mural on the outside of the former Spiro’s Mediterranean Market will likely either be taken down by the next developer of this spot or fall into disrepair due to neglect if it stays vacant for a long time.

A Wall of Icons

IMG_3135.jpg

In downtown Minneapolis, just a few blocks away from the junction of the green and blue light rail lines sits the iconic 1st Ave. Theater. For many St. Paul and Minneapolis locals this is one of the very first venues they will attend a concert at. On the flip-side for many local artists, performing at first Avenue is seen as the first step on the road to making it big. As can be seen in the picture, some of the very greatest musicians of all time such as Prince, REM and Nirvana have all performed at First Avenue.

The Landmark Center

landmarkplaza.jpg

The Landmark Center, on 5th Street near Rice Park, is an impressive building of Romanesque Revival architecture. Originally used as an administrative office for the state of Minnesota, it has been converted into cultural center for the arts: music, dance and theatre are common events that occur here.