Mural of the Working Class

Another side of the buildings off Carleton. I don’t know how long this mural has been here, but I’ve seen it ever since I got to the twin cities in 2017.

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Colorful Alleys

One of the many alleys of off the primarily empty parking lots along Carleton, off university. The back of the newer buildings seem to be pretty generic, but the alleys with older buildings have much more character, like these ones.

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Adventure in the everyday passageway

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When crossing the Minneapolis skyways, the complete window coverage on either side and the signs with an image of water as their background give off the feeling that one is walking through an aquarium tunnel or a river. For corporate workers walking through these corridors on their way to lunch or their car, I would imagine that this would attach a sense of adventure and grandeur to what could be just a routine convenience.

Seasonality of open spaces is for wimps

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In many open spaces, such as Macalester’s Bateman Plaza, the free and publically-available furniture is removed for the winter. This is understandable, considering that Minnesota has rather uninviting weather for its very long winter. However, on sunny days or earlier-than-expected spring weather days, Macalester students are left without a place to congregate with their friends outside. I find it both amusing and admirable that the city of Minneapolis has decided to leave this furniture out despite the inclement weather, in case anyone decides it’s a nice day to sit outside.

Continuing success of a growth machine

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When trying to justify the expense and disruption of megaprojects, many point to large events that draw outside visitors and capital. The costly and visually imposing US Bank Stadium was celebrated for drawing tens of thousands of visitors to attend the 2018 Super Bowl, and, according to the large sign on the side of the stadium, many more spectators can be expected next year at the NCAA Final Four.

An acceptable use of public space?

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We have discussed extensively how “public” actual public spaces are in class. In the Commons in Downtown Minneapolis, there is a sculpture that clearly resembles something one would find children climbing on at a playground. Without a sign to guide us, it was entirely possible that we were scaling something that was meant to be art, not a play structure. However, there was no indication that this was an inappropriate use of public space, so was this an acceptable way to interact with this object? We may never know…

Appropriate use of public space?

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We have discussed extensively how “public” actual public spaces are in class. In the Commons in Downtown Minneapolis, there is a sculpture that clearly resembles something one would find children climbing on at a playground. Without a sign to guide us, it was entirely possible that we were scaling something that was meant to be art, not a play structure. However, there was no indication that this was an inappropriate use of public space, so was this an acceptable way to interact with this object? We may never know…

The Rose from I-94

The Rose, to me, seems like an apology for the disruptive construction of I-94. It’s even located right by the highway, which I think is noteworthy because most people don’t like to live next to an interstate highway (lots of noise). Here is an image of the Rose from an I-94 overpass.I94 and the rose.jpg