Apartments off Raymond and University

One of the many historic loft apartment complexes off of Raymond and University. These complexes are all over and seem to complement the cultivated “hipster” aesthetic of the area with the tattoo shop, coffee shops, and record store. It felt very inauthentic to me, especially because the area along the LRT immediately before this is pretty low income.

IMG_1022

Advertisements

Adventure in the everyday passageway

IMG_0259

When crossing the Minneapolis skyways, the complete window coverage on either side and the signs with an image of water as their background give off the feeling that one is walking through an aquarium tunnel or a river. For corporate workers walking through these corridors on their way to lunch or their car, I would imagine that this would attach a sense of adventure and grandeur to what could be just a routine convenience.

Seasonality of open spaces is for wimps

IMG_0239

In many open spaces, such as Macalester’s Bateman Plaza, the free and publically-available furniture is removed for the winter. This is understandable, considering that Minnesota has rather uninviting weather for its very long winter. However, on sunny days or earlier-than-expected spring weather days, Macalester students are left without a place to congregate with their friends outside. I find it both amusing and admirable that the city of Minneapolis has decided to leave this furniture out despite the inclement weather, in case anyone decides it’s a nice day to sit outside.

An acceptable use of public space?

IMG_0244

We have discussed extensively how “public” actual public spaces are in class. In the Commons in Downtown Minneapolis, there is a sculpture that clearly resembles something one would find children climbing on at a playground. Without a sign to guide us, it was entirely possible that we were scaling something that was meant to be art, not a play structure. However, there was no indication that this was an inappropriate use of public space, so was this an acceptable way to interact with this object? We may never know…

Appropriate use of public space?

IMG_0244

We have discussed extensively how “public” actual public spaces are in class. In the Commons in Downtown Minneapolis, there is a sculpture that clearly resembles something one would find children climbing on at a playground. Without a sign to guide us, it was entirely possible that we were scaling something that was meant to be art, not a play structure. However, there was no indication that this was an inappropriate use of public space, so was this an acceptable way to interact with this object? We may never know…